Frequently Asked Questions

2013-04-05Resources

If you have any more questions or would like more information on one of the questions below, let us know by emailing us and we will get back to you with an answer.

How long do paving stones last?

Paving stones should last over 30 years, which is much longer than alternative pavements under normal residential use. (Source: Pavestone Consumer Guide, Concrete Paver Manufacturers of Ontario: 1996)

Can dirty or broken stones be replaced?

Yes. Most jobs have some stones left over. It is often easier and cheaper to replace even dirty stones rather than purchasing cleaners. Simply scrape out the sand surrounding the stone, remove the dirty or broken stone using a couple of screwdrivers, insert the new stone, replace the sand, and hammer the stone down with a rubber mallet to compact it. (Source: Pavestone Consumer Guide, Interlocking Concrete Paver Manufacturers of Ontario: 1996)

Do I have to seal the pavers?

No. Pavers are extremely durable. Sealing however may enhance colours and may prevent staining. If you choose to seal, do so a minimum of 60 to 90 days after completion of installation. Consult your dealer for complete sealing instructions. (Source: Pavestone Consumer Guide, Interlocking Concrete Paver Manufacturers of Ontario: 1996)

What is efflorescence?

Efflorescence is a white haze that may appear on the surface of concrete pavers after a few weeks or months. Efflorescence is completely natural and will disappear with time. Your products are not damaged or defective. Efflorescence is produced by cement which is a necessary ingredient in all concrete products. (Source: Managing Efflorescence on Concrete Pavers, Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute: 1999)

Can efflorescence be removed without the wait?

Yes. Efflorescence will eventually go away naturally, but there are commercial cleaners available that are specifically formulated for concrete pavers. Most cleaners contain acid and detergents, so be sure to follow all label directions and environmental regulations when using these cleaners. (Source: Managing Efflorescence on Concrete Pavers, Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute: 1999)